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  1. page Syllabi - Index edited ... Journalism Carrie Brown, CUNY Digital Media Entrepreneurship Michelle Ferrier, Ohio Univer…
    ...
    Journalism
    Carrie Brown, CUNY
    Digital Media Entrepreneurship
    Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University
    2013
    This is an intensive, winter term course syllabus.

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    9:19 am
  2. page Digital Media Entrepreneurship Intensive Course edited COM 373-DV Digital Media Entrepreneurship Winter 2013 Professor: Dr. Michelle Ferrier Office …

    COM 373-DV Digital Media Entrepreneurship
    Winter 2013
    Professor: Dr. Michelle Ferrier
    Office Phone: (336) 278-5737
    E-mail:mferrier@elon.edu
    Office: McEwen, Room 203C
    Course Description
    With a focus on entrepreneurial journalism, students in this incubation course identify business models for their venture ideas, conduct competitive analyses and market research, develop prototypes and pitch their business concepts to industry experts and funders. Students will learn how to identify a market need and opportunity for a media solution, learn lessons from startup founders and teams and understand how to structure their business for funding and sustainability.
    Course Goals and Expectations
    This course is designed to simulate the practices and skills in researching, developing and launching a new media product or service using digital delivery. The course focus is on audience/customers, value proposition and in creating an effective pitch.
    Students will take an idea of their own or work on a team project around a problem. Students may complete projects using Adobe InDesign, Adobe Flash, Photoshop, FinalCutPro, Wordpress, Excel and other software. In addition, students may use Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and other online tools for developing their projects. This software will not be taught in this class. Students are expected to be able to apply prior knowledge and take advantage of the knowledge of their peers and online resources. The underlying goal of the course is to create self-directed learners that will be able to continually update their knowledge and skills as new technologies emerge in the marketplace.
    Because this is an upper-level class, students are expected to participate in classroom discussions on the topic at hand. While the professor may present some lectures to the class, much of the class will be experiential, with students engaged in hands-on work and in generating conversation in class. You are responsible for your learning and for what your peers get out of the class.
    Course Objectives
    The objectives for the course include:
    1. Construct and deliver a pitch
    2. Conduct market research
    3. Conduct audience analysis
    4. Understand the entrepreneurial landscape/startup culture: key players, new products, delivery innovations, technological disruptions, financial options
    5. Conduct a competitive analysis
    6. Create a minimum viable product (a wireframe, prototype)
    7. Read and understand financial statements
    8. Understand basic pros and cons of different types of startup capital
    9. Understand legal and regulatory framework for specific businesses
    10.Differentiate between an idea and an opportunity; clearly state a value proposition
    11.Conceive and develop an idea
    12.Develop the components of a business plan
    Course Readings
    Briggs, Mark. (2011) Entrepreneurial Journalism: How to Build What’s Next for News. Los Angeles: Sage/CQ Press.
    Osterwalder, Alexander and Yves Pigneur. (2010) Business Model Generation. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
    Fast Company: http://www.fastcompany.com/
    TechCrunch: www.techcrunch.com
    Mashable: www.mashable.com
    And other readings as assigned.
    You are responsible for reading all assigned material for the class before the class as indicated on the course outline. You are also responsible for the material whether it is discussed in class or not. Any assigned readings, print or electronic, may be content for quizzes and tests.
    Other Classroom Activities/Homework/Participation. I expect you to participate in classroom activities and complete deliverables as I assign them throughout the semester. I also expect you to participate in class discussions. These activities and the "+ or –" assignments count toward your participation score (10 percent of your final grade).
    Amendments to the Syllabus and Course Outline: The professor reserves the right to make changes to this syllabus. Changes will be announced either in class, through email or via Moodle.
    Classroom and Course Policies
    {https://media-entrepreneurship-course-development.wikispaces.com/site/embedthumbnail/placeholder?w=437&h=50}
    Attendance Policy
    COM 373 is course that demands your presence. We expect students in a professional school to come to class every time on time and be prepared to work for the entire session. Participation is an important component of success. You will be doing graded work during nearly every class session, thus if you miss a session it will have even more negative impact on your grade. The School of Communications attendance policy is attached to this document. It states: Teachers will lower the final grade in a class for each absence beyond the equivalent of one week of class (three absences for classes meeting three times a week, two absences for classes meeting twice a week, and one absence during winter term or a summer session). Students participating in university-sponsored travel must submit a written request in advance to the professor. Such students will be expected to work ahead to complete work due during the anticipated absence. A student who misses more than 20 percent of scheduled classes in a term for any reason, excused or not, automatically receives an F because the student has missed too much content and participation to pass a course in a professional school.
    * If you are ill or if you must miss a class due to an unforeseen problem, please inform me before class or as soon as possible afterward by sending an e-mail or by leaving a phone message.
    It is important to make full use of the few minutes we have each day. Late arrival to class (more than 5 minutes) counts as a missed class for that day. After three late arrivals, your final course grade will automatically be reduced by a full grade level. Four late arrivals may result in an "F" for the course.**
    Coursework
    If you miss a class because of illness, participation in a university-sponsored activity, job interview or other causes, you have missed valuable content and engaged learning. In this sense, excused and unexcused absences are no different. The School of Communications policy says that to ensure that you avoid a gap in your progression in this course, your professor may assign additional work. For example, you may be asked to write a 400-word summary of material covered in a missed class session or you may be asked to complete an additional assignment that demonstrates comprehension of material covered. No missed writing or discussion assignment can be made up later without written documentation showing an acceptable reason for your delay (near-death experiences may be considered acceptable). Receiving an excused absence includes making up the work within one week. It is your responsibility to inquire about making up missed work.
    Tests and Assignments
    Final Exam: You are expected to take the final exam at the scheduled time. Because the final exam is a presentation to your peers and judges, there is no makeup for this date.
    Assignments/Deliverables: When you work with clients or in a business launch, you have deliverables, not assignments. Deliverables are just that…work that is due to be delivered on a specific day. Deliverables must be turned in when they are due…no exceptions.
    Honor Code
    All students are expected to abide by the Elon University Honor Code - "On my honor, I will uphold the values of Elon University: honesty, integrity, responsibility and respect." Adherence to these values is expected from students at all times in and out of the classroom. Breaches of these values will result in an academic or social honor code violation report. In this class, honor code violations, including plagiarism, fabrication of content, lying, cheating and facilitating academic dishonesty may result in a lower grade or failure of the course. "Intent" is not a factor in determining responsibility for an offense; know and understand what plagiarism, cheating and fabrication are, and do not commit these acts. You can learn more about the honor code, the adjudication process and possible sanctions at http://www.elon.edu/e-web/students/handbook/judicialhonor.xhtml. Contact me about any behavior or activity that might be a violation of the code.
    All work in this class is expected to be your own original work. No plagiarizing. No recycling of work from previous courses. No cutting and pasting. I will spot-check and verify quoted sources.
    Preparation
    Follow your syllabus and your professor's assignments/deliverables carefully! Complete assigned text and other readings prior to class sessions. Complete assigned writing assignments or outside tasks prior to set deadlines. If you work ahead, you have time to go back over your work and check for thoroughness, errors, etc. Come to class prepared to answer questions about assigned readings. It is a good idea to save your work “in the cloud” so it is accessible at all times from any computer.
    Grading
    The university defines grades as follows:
    A indicates distinguished performance,
    B indicates above-average performance,
    C indicates an average performance in which a basic understanding of the
    subject has been demonstrated,
    D indicates a passing performance despite some deficiencies, and
    F indicates failure.
    Deliverables
    Deliverables
    Points Possible
    Class Social Media Contributions
    10 x 10 points = 100 points
    9-Square Business Analysis and Testing
    100 points
    Customer Development/Competitive Analysis
    100 points
    Revenue Spreadsheet
    100 points
    Online/Mobile Strategy/Wireframes
    100 points
    Inventor’s Notebook
    100 points
    Founder Interview/Case Study
    100 points
    Classroom Participation
    100 points
    Pitch Presentation
    100 points
    Final Exam
    100 points
    TOTAL
    1,000 points
    Points on deliverables will translate into these letter grades: A, 930-1000; B, 850-929; C, 770-849; D, 700-769; F, below 700.
    Inappropriate Classroom Behaviors
    "Participation" points docked for…
    Reading materials or surfing Web sites not related to this class
    Sending e-mail, IM-ing, using a cell phone, or text messaging
    Whispering/talking during lectures/and for non-participation in discussions
    Not having questions prepared for guest speakers
    Coming to class late and/or unprepared
    If you break these rules, I will take note and dock the points. I will not discuss this with you or disrupt the class to point it out; I will just do it.
    E-mail and Course Expectations
    I will e-mail you to provide you with updates about deliverables or the class schedule. Please make sure that you check your Elon e-mail address at least once daily.
    Students with Special Needs & Circumstances
    If you are a student with a documented disability who will require accommodations in this course, please register with Disabilities Services in the Duke Building, Room 108 (278-6500) for assistance in developing a plan to address your academic needs.
    Religious Holidays
    Elon University embraces the mission of an academic community that influences and transforms mind, body, and spirit. The following policy guiding procedure for the observance of recognized holydays is consistent with and complementary to the University’s mission.
    In recognition that observance of recognized religious holidays <http://www.elon.edu/e-web/students/religious_life/ReligiousHolidays.xhtml#Recognized_Holidays> may affect students' classroom attendance and the submission of graded work in courses, Elon University has established procedures to be followed by students for notifying their instructors of an absence necessitated by the observance. This policy reflects the University's commitment to being responsive to our increasing diversity and to encourage students' spiritual development. In accordance with the policy, students who miss class to observe a specified religious holiday are required to discuss with their instructor when and how any missed assignments will be made up. The student should consult his or her academic dean if an instructor is unable or unwilling to grant the request. Absence from class due to observance of a religious holiday is excused according to University policy.
    School of Communications
    Professional Standards Policies
    The School of Communications has adopted the following minimum policies to provide students with a clear understanding and consistent application of course expectations, since journalism and communications are disciplines with rigorous professional standards. Teachers may designate more stringent policies on their course syllabi.
    Attendance Policy
    Students in the School of Communications are expected to attend all classes. Just as professionals go to work each day, we expect students in a professional school to come to class on time and be prepared to work.
    A student who misses more than 20% of scheduled classes in a term (more than eight absences for classes meeting three times a week, more than five absences for classes meeting twice a week, more than three absences for classes meeting once a week) automatically receives an F because the student has missed too much content and participation to pass a course in a professional school.
    Teachers will lower the final grade in a class for each absence beyond the equivalent of one week of class (three absences for classes meeting three times a week, two absences for classes meeting twice a week, and one absence during winter term, a summer session, or a once-a-week class during a regular semester) as indicated in the course syllabus. An exception may exist for a student who misses more than a week of classes for a sanctioned university activity, such as presenting research at a national forum, class travel or university athletic travel. Students participating in such events must submit a written request in advance to the professor.
    Coursework
    If students miss a class because of illness, participation in a university-sponsored activity, job interview or other causes, they have missed valuable content and engaged learning. In this sense, excused and unexcused absences are no different. To ensure that students avoid gaps in the progression of a course, professors may assign additional work. For example, a professor may require a student to write a 400-word summary of material covered in a missed class session or complete an additional lab assignment that demonstrates comprehension of material covered.
    Tests and Examinations
    If students miss a quiz, test or examination they must submit a written request for a makeup to the professor. Students who miss a final examination must secure permission for a makeup from the department chair. As indicated in the Elon University Faculty Handbook, “students are not guaranteed permission to make up examinations and have no guarantees about the impact of the absence on their final grade for the course.”
    Assignments
    Professionals meet deadlines. All assignments should be submitted on time, and they are due on the assigned date even if the student is absent from class. A teacher may choose not to accept late work, or to lower a grade by one letter for each weekday it is late.
    Honor Code
    All students are expected to uphold the four fundamental values of the Elon Honor Code:
    Honesty
    Integrity
    Responsibility
    Respect
    Breaches of these values will result in an academic or social honor code violation report. Honor code violations include: plagiarism, lying, cheating, stealing or vandalism, and facilitating academic dishonesty. These violations may result in the lowering of a grade or failure of a class. While “intent” may be considered in assigning sanctions, it is not a factor in determining responsibility for an offense. Students should consult with their professor if they are uncertain about whether specific activities are violations of the honor code.
    Academic Honesty
    The School of Communications takes plagiarism seriously, just as businesses and other media organizations and scholars do.
    All forms of dishonesty mentioned above may result in an F in a course and expulsion from the university. Although all of these are clear violations of the university Honor Code, plagiarism is a special concern for communications professionals and scholars.
    What is plagiarism? It is using someone else’s work such as passages, photographs, music, video, graphics and other images, and claiming it as your own. It can be copying work that has appeared in a journal, a magazine, a newspaper or online – anywhere, really – and presenting it as your own. Cutting and pasting passages from the Web into your work, for example, is plagiarism unless you credit the source of the material or images. Take this as your guiding principle: If you quote someone else’s words or appropriate their image, attribute the source.
    In brief, you may not adopt or reproduce the ideas, words or statements of another person without acknowledgment or attribution. In many cases, such work is copyrighted. Acknowledgment is required when borrowing facts, statistics, images or illustrative material, unless that information is common knowledge or in the public domain. (Example: China is the most populous nation on Earth. Or: Jupiter is the largest planet in our solar system.)
    If you quote someone else’s words or use information or material acquired or created by someone else, then you must attribute the source.
    Definitions and examples of Elon Honor Code violations above may be found at
    http://www.elon.edu/e-web/students/handbook/judicialhonor.xhtml
    I have read the syllabus for COM 373 Digital Media Entrepreneurship and I am prepared to engage fully with the professor, class, course materials and other requirements as outlined in this document.
    Signed Date
    Printed Name ___
    COM 373 Digital Media Entrepreneurship
    Readings
    http://www.locallygrownnews.com/stories/BlogHer-Food-Transcript-of-Taking-Your-Blog-Mobile,27867
    http://www.locallygrownnews.com/stories/BlogHer-Food-Transcript-of-How-Bloggers-Work-with-Brands-and-Media,27866

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  3. page Syllabi - Index edited ... 2012 This magazine course embeds principles of entrepreneurship within a magazine course. Stu…
    ...
    2012
    This magazine course embeds principles of entrepreneurship within a magazine course. Students develop magazine startup ideas, create mockups and pitch their ideas before a panel of industry professionals.
    Grading Rubric
    Entrepreneurial
    Journalism
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  4. page Grading Rubric _Magazine Publishing Course edited Name _ Magazine ___ Deliverables Points Possible Individual Work By When? Class Blog Contribu…
    Name _ Magazine ___
    Deliverables
    Points Possible
    Individual Work
    By When?
    Class Blog Contributions
    5 x 10 points = 50 points
    Still Ongoing
    Historical Magazine Analysis
    50 points
    Done
    Current Magazine Analysis
    50 points
    Wednesday,
    Feature Article/Layout*
    50 points
    Draft due today
    Final due by?
    Department/Column Layout*
    50 points
    Draft due today
    Final due by ?
    Table of Contents Sample*
    50 points
    Done
    Group Work
    9-Square Business Analysis and Testing
    50 points
    Done
    Target Audience/Competitive Analysis
    50 points
    Done
    Revenue Spreadsheet
    Group Evaluation
    100 points
    Due 5/4
    Online/Mobile Strategy/Wireframes
    [Marketing/Promotion/Design]
    100 points
    Strategy: Done
    Wireframes: Due 4/27 with prototype
    Using Photoshop and an online picture of an iPhone or pencil and paper, design the home screen of your online or mobile strategy
    Media Kit [Circulation/Editor]
    -Editorial Statement
    -Editorial Calendar
    -List of Potential Advertisers
    100 points
    Due: 4/20
    Gathered from prior work in Google Docs and from competitive analysis
    Prototype [Editor/Designer]
    -Logo/Cover Design
    -Table of Contents*
    -Departments/Columns*
    -Feature Articles *
    100 points
    DUE: 4/27
    Cover: Finalize logo, cover design and blurbs based on prototype table of contents
    TOC: Represents in detail and design, your TOC
    Departments/Columns: Pick the best of your columns/departments from your teams and design/edit around those. One (1) of each.
    Feature: Pick one (1) the features from your team and create the print ready page layout.
    Magazine Pitch [Team]
    100 points
    DUE: 5/7*
    Create a 5-7 slide “pitch deck”. Instructions for pitch deck and demos to come before
    *Pitch is completed with final exam presentation to panel of magazine experts.
    Classroom Participation
    100 points
    Prepared at team meetings to discuss progress, assignments, deadlines.
    In-Class Discussion
    TOTAL
    1,000 points

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  5. page 25 Key Digital Media Competencies edited ... Necessary to Do Business and Stay Competitive in the Digital Age [Adapted from PlanetDigital,…
    ...
    Necessary to Do Business and Stay Competitive in the Digital Age
    [Adapted from PlanetDigital, Orlando Florida list of competencies]
    Contributed by Dr. Michelle Ferrier, Ohio University
    Rate your level of knowledge on a scale of 1-5 with 5 being the highest. Choose one and apply to each competency:
    Awareness
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  6. page 25 Key Digital Media Competencies edited ... Expertise Digital Media Content Creation 1. Digital Digital Photography and ... Example:…
    ...
    Expertise
    Digital Media Content Creation
    1. DigitalDigital Photography and
    ...
    Example: Photoshop
    2. Video

    Video
    Production for
    ...
    picture content.
    3. Image/Video

    Image/Video
    Sharing/Posting (compressing,
    ...
    Photobucket, etc.
    4. Mobile

    Mobile
    Content Development
    ...
    iPad, VCast
    5. 3D

    3D
    Visualization, Simulation
    ...
    Product R&D
    6. Graphic

    Graphic
    Design is
    Content Management and Delivery
    7. OnlineOnline Media Distribution
    ...
    Example: YouTube
    8. Disc-Based

    Disc-Based
    Data Distribution
    ...
    Pro, disc duplication
    9. Digital
    duplicatio
    Digital
    Asset Management
    ...
    Bridge, DigiBase.
    10.Web

    Web
    Content Management:
    Business Communications
    11.PresentationPresentation Development uses
    ...
    to others.
    12.Digital

    Digital
    Signage: In-store
    ...
    specific times.
    13.Blogging,

    Blogging,
    RSS Newsfeeds,
    ...
    (see #7).
    14.Social

    Social
    Networking uses
    ...
    business success.
    15.Instant

    Instant
    Messaging, Chat
    Online Advertising and Marketing
    16.SearchSearch Engine Optimization
    ...
    search engines.
    17.Paid

    Paid
    Online Advertising
    ...
    increasing sales
    18.Geotargeted

    Geotargeted
    Advertising: The
    ...
    zip code.
    19.Affiliate

    Affiliate
    Marketing and
    ...
    sale (pay-per-sale).
    20.Email

    Email
    Marketing uses
    ...
    a sale.
    21.Integrated

    Integrated
    Marketing and
    Business Systems, Operations and Processes
    22.KnowledgeKnowledge Management/Intranets uses
    ...
    maintain processes.
    23.E-Commerce

    E-Commerce
    consists of
    ...
    computer networks.
    24.Database

    Database
    Development and
    ...
    Business dashboards
    25.Project

    Project
    Management and
    ...
    unified system.

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